PROGRAMME > Keynote Lectures

2nd International Conference on Advanced Surface Enhancement

6 - 9 Sept 2021 | Marriott Tang Plaza Hotel, Singapore

Shot-Peening: Reflecting Back and Looking Forward

Professor Shaker A. Meguid

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Surface Engineering of Metals with Interstitials

Professor Marcel A.J. Somers

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Sustainable Tribology: A Key to Surface Enhancement

Professor Noritsugu Umehara

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Shot-Peening: Reflecting Back and Looking Forward
 

Professor Shaker A. Meguid

Mechanics and Aerospace Design Lab
University of Toronto, Canada
meguid@mie.utoronto.ca

 

Abstract

In spite of its importance to the aerospace and automobile industry, shot peening remains mostly a “black-box” treatment encircled by scientifically unsound and at times disturbing claims. Reflecting back, this may be partly because shot peening is a derivative of “blast cleaning” and partly because of the convergence of other impact surface treatments such as laser peening and ultrasonic. Until recently, a sizeable number of practitioners are unable to comprehend the relevance, or lack thereof, of the “mystical” Almen intensity, converge and robotically controlled treatment to the beneficial residual stress field. Adding insult to injury, I believe that some aspects of shot-peening specifications are compiled in a “cook-book-like” format, lacking in accuracy and may be scientific rigor.  


Looking forward, I see a future for the process - if we to overcome some of the challenges facing it. These include designing machine components with peening in mind, properly instrumented and controlled treatment, and relating residual stresses to the kinetic energy of the jet stream, which will ultimately guarantee the integrity of the treated components. Additionally, we must ask ourselves whether the shift from metallic to composite materials in the transport industry would render the peening treatment obsolete. In this keynote lecture, I shall provide an in-depth coverage of the above issues as well as discuss some of my own research efforts of the process over the past 20 years.

About the speaker

 

Professor Shaker Meguid is an internationally renowned scholar with significant contributions in computational and experimental mechanics at varied length scales. Undoubtedly, his research activities have contributed significantly to the areas of multiscale modelling, advanced and smart nanocomposites, crashworthiness, fracture mechanics and failure prevention. He has published 295 papers in leading tier-1 scientific journals, 240 presentations in international conferences of significance with a large number being invited as keynote and plenary speaker. He authored 4 books on fracture mechanics, nanomechanics and micromechanics, edited17 international conference proceedings and contributed 17 book chapters. 


He is the Founding Editor-in-Chief of International Journal of Mechanics and Materials in Design, former Technical Associate Editor of ASME J. of Engineering Materials and Technology (for two consecutive terms), former Associate Editor of IMechE Journal of Mechanical Process Engineering, Guest Editor to a number of Journals including Mechanics of Materials and a member of the editorial board of numerous journals. He is also the Founding Head of the Aerospace Engineering Division of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He taught different branches of mechanics in 4 continents: Europe (Manchester, Oxford (England) and Milano Polytechnic University (Italy)); North America (Toronto, Canada), and Asia (NTU, Singapore), Hunan, Peking, Defence Technology, and BIT (China), and Africa (Cairo University, Egypt). 


He is an Engineering Consultant to the United Nations, a lifetime senior member of AIAA, member of the American Academy of Mechanics, Professional Engineer in the Province of Ontario (PEng), Chartered Engineer in Great Britain (CEng), Fellow of ASME, Fellow of IMechE and Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada. He works closely with the aerospace and automotive industries and is regularly approached by members of the media for clarification of engineering issues and accidents. 


Professor Meguid and his research team won numerous awards, with the most recent honor being the nomination for the gold medal by the Governor General of Canada, holder of the Robert Hooke Award bestowed by the European Society for Experimental Mechanics, Engineering Award-Research and Development by the Professional Engineers of Ontario for his significant contribution to research and development in Canada.
 

Surface Engineering of Metals with Interstitials

Marcel A.J. Somers and Thomas L. Christiansen

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark 
Produktionstorvet b. 425, DK 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
somers@mek.dtu.dk; tch@mek.dtu.dk 

 

Abstract

Alloying with interstitial atoms is well-known to have a beneficial effect on the strength and hardness of metals. This strengthening effect is generally much more effective than alloying with substitutional atoms. Carburizing and nitriding of steels are the most widely applied surface engineering treatments where interstitials are deliberately dissolved in the surface region. The presentation will show-case work from the authors’ laboratory on the thermochemical surface engineering of stainless steels, titanium alloys, bulk metallic glasses and high entropy alloys. 


Stainless steels can dissolve nitrogen and/or carbon into an austenitic, martensitic or duplex stainless steel matrix.  High and low temperature thermochemical surface engineering treatment variants were developed to tailor surface-related materials performance as corrosion, wear and fatigue. These treatments can also be applied to additively manufactured stainless steels.


Titanium and its alloys can be surface engineered with carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen and combinations thereof. This provides a large window for strengthening possibilities and particularly surface hardening. The challenge with titanium alloys, is to design surface engineering processes that comply with the strength/microstructure of the alloy.


Bulk-metallic glasses containing Zr, Cu and Al as the major components, can be surface engineered with oxygen (among other interstitials). Surface oxidation introduces compressive residual stresses in the oxidized zone and enhances the hardness importantly. A peculiar phenomenon is the occurrence self-healing of small cracks by segregation of noble elements.
High entropy alloys (HEAs) form a new class of metals with sheer unlimited possibilities. Surface engineering of fcc HEAs with nitrogen and carbon can result in high surface hardness, comparable to – or even higher than - what is achievable in austenitic stainless steels.

About the speaker

 

Professor Marcel A.J. Somers (1960) received his M.Sc. degree in physical metallurgy (1985) and his Doctor’s degree (1989) from Delft University of Technology (NL). In 89/90 he was with Philips Center for Materials, Technology and Innovation as section leader in advanced materials characterization. He returned to Delft University of Technology as assistant professor in physical chemistry of the solid state in 1990 and was appointed full professor of physical metallurgy at the Technical University of Denmark in 1997. A red thread through Somers’ scientific work is gas-metal interactions in surface engineering with interstitials and gaseous corrosion along with advanced microstructure characterization. Furthermore, his interests encompass martensitic transformations at cryogenic temperatures and thermodynamics and diffusion modelling. 


His work is of fundamental character with a technological importance and spin-off for industrial application. In 2000 he established a university group in Materials and Surface Engineering, which he has headed since. Marcel Somers is an enthusiastic educator in physical metallurgy, materials characterization and surface engineering and has co-authored over 300 contributions in international journals, conference proceedings and chapters in books. He is co-editor of the comprehensive book “Thermochemical Surface Engineering of Steels”. Moreover, he is co-inventor of 15 patents and co-founder of the industrial spin-outs Expanite and TRD Surfaces. 


He was awarded the Brandsma prize (1989); ASM European Lecturer (1999); Reinholdt W. Jorck prize (2001); DTU's innovation prize (2007); Alex Foss gold medal for rewarding contributions to engineering sciences (2014); Fellow of ASM International (2016) and the IFHTSE Medal (2019). He is an elected member of the Danish Society for Technical Sciences (ATV) since 1999 and was chairman of the Danish Research Council for Technology and Production Sciences (FTP) from 2007 to 2009. 

Sustainable Tribology: A Key to Surface Enhancement
 

Professor Noritsugu Umehara

Graduate School of Engineering 
Nagoya University, Japan
ume@mech.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Abstract

Energy is deeply entrenched in every aspect of our lives and is reflected in each of the economic, social and environmental dimensions of societal development. Noteworthy is the fact that extensive use of energy can increase carbon footprints and greenhouse gas emissions and mismanagement of energy resources can cause harm to our ecosystems. Essentially, we must reduce the inefficient systemic losses resulting from friction and wear, and at the same time, seek low impact alternatives to the environmentally damaging lubricant practices already in existence. 


The concept of friction and wear has concerned great scientists since the time of Aristotle, Leonardo Da Vinci and Coulomb. Nowadays, tribology is a wide-ranging multi-disciplinary field of study and research concerned with lifecycle, durability, reliability and efficiency of mechanical systems.


This keynote lecture will address friction and wear losses, durability and sustainability of the main engineering components in varied mechanical systems. Specifically, I will address the challenges facing our environment and the crucial role to be played by green tribology. Next, I will summarize the emerging new research areas of sustainable tribology that deal with the preservation of energy, environmental protection as well as improving our quality of life.

About the speaker

 

Professor Noritsugu Umehara is a professor in the Department of Micro-Nano Mechanical Science and Engineering at Nagoya University, Japan. He has interests in both fundamental and applied aspects of manufacturing and tribology, especially in new polishing method of advanced ceramic materials using magnetic field and water lubrication. He received his Bachelor, Master and a Doctorate of Engineering from Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi in 1983, 1985 and 1988, respectively. He began his carrier at Tohoku University in 1988 as a Research Associate in the Department of Mechanical Engineering prior to becoming Assistant Professor in 1993, Associate Professor in 1995. Professor Umehara joined Nagoya University as Professor in 2003. 


He publishes extensively in the relevant materials, manufacturing and tribology journals, and his scholarly work led to 6 Patents on Magnetic Fluid Grinding. He is regularly invited to give plenary and keynote lectures in international meetings and consults for the Japanese automotive industry. He directs the Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory in Nagoya University. Dr.Umehara received the JSME Young Engineering award in 1991; 1995 LaRoux K. Gillespie Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award from the society of manufacturing engineers in 1995; F.W. Tayler Medal from the CIRP in 1995; and JSME paper award in 2010. He is a member of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME), the Japan Society for Precision Engineering (JSPE), the Japan Society of Tribologist (JAST) and the Japan Society for Grinding Engineering. He is also the current Chair of MicroNano Mechanical Science and Engineering Department, Graduate School of Engineering, and Adviser to the president of Nagoya University, Japan.

ORGANISER CONTACT

Advanced Remanufacturing and Technology Centre

3 Cleantech Loop, #01/01 CleanTech Two
Singapore 637143

Tel: +65 6908 7900

Email: INCASE2021@artc.a-star.edu.sg

Website: https://www.a-star.edu.sg/artc

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